It is no secret to many of you that we homeschool our youngest son. The reason for this is multi-faceted. The main reason is because our son has been “diagnosed” by the school as having an “autism-spectrum disability” (he was not diagnosed by a doctor, however; the doctor concurred with us that our son was not disabled or delayed in any way), and because of this “diagnosis,” the school endeavored to have him put into a classroom in the basement of the school with no windows with children who could not speak or communicate with other people. No sunshine, no friends to play with, stunted curriculum far below his level… this is a boy who has been reading, spelling, adding and subtracting and much more since he was 3, a child who drew a complete – and correct – diagram of the internal organs on himself with a permanent marker at the age of 4 (yes, I have pictures lol) and could name every organ. He is not delayed, he is advanced. The school was either unable or unwilling to recognize this. So we pulled him out and have never regretted it.

There is another reason, however, and it is what I would like to talk about today: The school system’s continuing overreach into people’s personal lives. A perfect example is the school “diagnosing” my son with autism. The school and their employees cannot diagnose anyone with anything; they are not doctors. They have no business attaching labels to children – a label, I might add, that in our case a medical specialist did not agree with. Schools also often want to conduct home visits and myriad other things. They are the school, not the police. I homeschool specifically because I do not want or need the government or their employees in my home.

Today I read a story online about Leeza Pearson in Aurora, Colorado. Ms. Pearson sent her child to school with a packed lunch just as she does every day. The lunch consisted of a ham and cheese sandwich, string cheese and a 4-pack of Oreos. On this day, however, Ms. Pearson received a note from the Children’s Academy in Aurora, Colorado. The child was apparently prohibited from eating the Oreos because the school stated they weren’t nutritious enough.

The school also apparently sent a note home that read:

“Dear Parents, it is very important that all students have a nutritious lunch. This is a public school setting and all children are required to have a fruit, a vegetable and a heavy snack from home, along with a milk. If they have potatoes, the child will also need bread to go along with it. Lunchables, chips, fruit snacks, and peanut butter are not considered to be a healthy snack. This is a very important part of our program and we need everyone’s participation.”

The school has now backtracked on this issue, saying that no such note should have been sent home to any parent.

Aside from the obvious absurdity of insisting on potatoes and bread (two starches is healthy? OK…), what right does the school have to be involved here at all? It’s not rat poison, it’s 4 cookies. Four cookies. This is a massive overstepping of boundaries on the part of yet another government institution: the public school. This is becoming more and more common and people have got to push back against it or we may find ourselves no longer in charge of our children’s lives.

My 6 year old nephew – 6, not 16 – was sent home from school the other day because he threw a tantrum that included saying something about killing. My sister was told that she had to take him to a mental health evaluation or he could not come back to school. She was also told the school would call child protective services if she did not comply. My sister did as directed by the school. The doctor’s response? “This the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard. The school needs to learn how to control a child throwing a tantrum.” Just another ridiculous overreaction from people who have no business making themselves the authority on subjects they apparently know absolutely nothing about. Do any of these people even have kids?

Take a lesson from these things, parents. Pay attention to what is going on with your children before it’s too late.

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